Hermès: a haudenschild Garage project with MARK BRADFORD

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6.3.2013 conversation with Mark and Hermès

The Bradford Studio, Los Angeles, CA

How did I end up with the installation of the bold lines? The whole project has to do with psychological mapping and a fragmented reality. My understanding of the neighbor where the installation will be is that she had two realities – a public reality and a very private reality and the private reality was really fragmented. She had dualities, and building on the narrative of what I’ve learned, I decided to give the psychological fragmentation a 3D form, in other words, a large installation that had site, materiality and physicality. And since I am an abstract painter, I am also interested in social abstraction – an abstraction that is not the traditional abstraction that looks inward and ignores the outside of the studio, but an abstraction that looks out towards the environment and into the social body that we call the city or the society. And so I looked into this social abstraction, an abstraction that references the geo-abstraction of the 1970s…and earlier than that, Frank Stella. And so I looked at the idea of a line and historically what it meant and built on that. My design is one continuous line and one gesture – one brush stroke that continues all over the house. I wanted to make it feel domestic and also have a relationship with art history. I also wanted to feel like the domestic space was invaded and it was somehow fractured and uncomfortable. And so the marks are aggressive and demand your attention. It is more like a steamroller running through your home. And so it is this idea of fragmentation and abstraction and secrets in domestic spaces that break away the fabric of the house. Think about the yellow brick road for a second, this strange yellow path that led to Oz. I think of this dystopic yellow brick road on its way to very dark places in America, very dark places in our psyche…

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